Traumatic Brain Injury

The hot topic in sports today is traumatic brain injuries or concussions.  More alarmingly, a significant portion of accidents involving motor vehicles result in traumatic brain injury, including car collisions, truck and 18-wheeler accidents, and injury resulting from motorcycle accidents.  The first thing to come to mind is always the trauma for the person involved, but the price for the person injured and suffering from traumatic brain injury can be devastating for your emotional, economic, and social well-being as well.  Our firm sees many clients that walk away from an auto and truck accident only to have serious pain, motor, sensory, and emotional problems develop shortly thereafter.  If you’ve been in an auto, truck, or motorcycle accident or a work-related injury, and suspect traumatic brain injury or concussion, you need to get evaluated immediately and contact and experienced personal injury firm of attorneys like Ron Voyles & Associates.  Auto, truck, and motorcycle accidents can initially appear innocuous and then spin out of control quickly.  Here’s what you need to know.

First off, most people are not aware that over two million cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) occur each year. It is much more common than you think. Second, people are not aware that blunt impacts causing traumatic brain injury are also one of the major causes of death in the United States.  Concussions and mild traumatic brain injury are one of the main reasons for people to visit the emergency room each year.  Changes can be irreversible, which is why it is so important to get evaluated by a specialist and to contact a personal injury attorney with experience in traumatic brain injury.  At Ron Voyles & Associates, we have decades of experience in dealing with traumatic brain injury, concussions, and car and truck accidents.

A TBI can be caused by any blunt force trauma to the head.  This includes blows, jolts (as in a seatbelt), bumps, or any other trauma that disrupts the normal function of the brain.  Symptoms can be as mild as in brief disorientation, changes in your mental status, or even a brief loss of consciousness.  Symptoms can also be much more severe including longer periods of unconsciousness and even loss of memory and emotional distress.  If you have been in an auto or truck accident or work-related injury and have suffered from memory loss, impaired thinking, vertigo, loss of vision or hearing, personality changes, depression, or irregular emotional functioning, chances are you are suffering from traumatic brain injury.

Falls are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury.  Over half of all emergency room visits are due to falls.  The second leading cause of traumatic brain injury is being struck by or against an object.  The third leading cause of emergency room visits is traumatic brain injury caused by motor vehicle crashes.

Think about it like this.  Your brain floats inside your skull.  When you hit your head in your vehicle, get bounced around, or even have a quick acceleration-deceleration injury (whiplash), your brain smashes into your skull.  As a result, your brain becomes torn and bruised.  When your auto is involved in a collision, something as light and innocuous as a Kleenex box can become a deadly projectile.  Think about what happens when your head hits your steering wheel or the window of your car.  The effects can be devastating.  You may not even be aware that you hit your head due to loss of consciousness in the motor vehicle crash or even a work-related injury.

If you or a loved one is in an auto, truck, or motorcycle accident, or is injured in a work-related injury where worker’s compensation isn’t covering the injury, you need to see an experienced personal injury attorney immediately.  Symptoms you need to look for in a potential case of traumatic brain injury are:

  • Attention, memory, and cognitive function problems.
  • Loss of coordination and balance, motor weakness, and numbness and weakness in your extremities.
  • Emotional problems such as, personality changes, aggression, depression, anxiety, and impulse control.
  • Loss of sensory perception, such as vision, hearing, and touch.

If you suspect any of these signs in yourself or a loved one, contact our firm immediately.

Contact Ron Voyles Today